Amy Adams on her career, life, motherhood, and Oscar

The Telegraph published yesterday an amazing interview with Amy Adams, in which they talked about pretty much everything. Her life before being famous, her earlier career, working with DiCaprio and Tom Hanks, about Aviana and being a working mom, about having post-natal depression (which came out as a huge surprise to me), about the pressure and the feelings on her wining an Oscar and, of course, about Big Eyes.

Playing Keane – whose husband, Walter, for a decade passed off her Big Eye paintings as his own – has heightened Adams’s interest in art. ‘Now Darren will take me to these underground art shows and exhibitions, and you can see how her influence lives on.’ She hasn’t yet heard Keane’s reaction to the film, and when I read to her what the 87-year-old painter told a newspaper in October – ‘It was really traumatic. Christoph Waltz looks like Walter, sounds like him, acts like him. And to see Amy going through what I went through… It’s very accurate’ – Adams looks relieved. ‘That’s really what you want when you’re playing someone. Not to traumatise them,’ she adds with a prettily lopsided smile, ‘but to be accurate.’

One of my favourite parts of the article is this one:

One of seven children, Adams was raised a Mormon until the age of 12, when her parents divorced and left the Church. ‘It instilled a certain work ethic in me,’ she says. ‘Everybody was always expected to pitch in and help around the house.’ There’s a glass-half-full legacy too. ‘My aunt always used to say, “A happy day keeps the blues away,” and I loved her for that. I read something recently about how the way we greet our children in the morning dictates so much of their self-worth during the day, and of course it can be hard if you’re up early and tired, but I try to put a smile on and be cheery with my daughter [four-year-old Aviana]. Non-morning people would probably find that really annoying,’ she laughs.

Go to The Telegraph to read the full interview.