The Guardian: “‘I thought, if I can’t figure this out, I can’t work any more’

Earlier this month The Guardian has published a great article with Amy, made right after the Arrival premiere at BFI London Festival. They mentioned the headlines made the day after, about a supposed “wardrobe malfunction”, and the interview started from it. Go to their website for the full piece, but here’s an excerpt:

When we meet in a central London hotel, she is wearing a simple blue dress and oversized matching cardigan which she hugs around her protectively; only her blow-dried hair and full makeup, still fresh from a photo shoot, suggest a life that involves a little more maintenance than that of your average woman.

“Are you going to ask about my dress [from the premiere]?” she asks warily, and her shoulders hunch a little as she retreats a few inches back on the sofa.

No, I was going to mention the gross reaction to it, I say.

“Oh right!” she says, moving forward, shoulders relaxing. “You know, this is something I struggle with because I’m not going to wear turtlenecks for ever. So I hope we can get to a point where a woman can wear a low-cut gown and still have some relevance. It’s disheartening, and having a daughter it’s doubly disheartening, that we’re still here. I was talking about this earlier with my husband: can you imagine a woman saying about a man, ‘Well, you saw how his pants fit – you could clearly see the curve of his bottom! And I’m not supposed to touch it? Come on!’” This subject means so much to her that, despite her wholesome Midwestern nature, she dares to say ‘bottom’ to a stranger – although she winces a little. Normally, her strongest expressions run the gamut from “gee” to “gosh”.