Amy Adams Fan - online since 2008 - is your online guide to the talented and beautiful actress know for movies such as Enchanted, The Fighter, Junebug, and most recently American Hustle. Here you can find information about the five-time Oscar-nominee and all of her films, an extensive photo gallery housing over 80,000 pictures, a streaming video archive and much, much more.
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Gallery Trouble With The Curve
18 September 2012   1 Comment

Thanks to my friend Marica, we have now over 30 new beautiful HQ pictures of Amy last Saturday during the “Trouble With The Curve” press conference. Enjoy!

Trouble With The Curve
18 September 2012   No Comments

I guess I’m a little bit confused. After being told up one side and down the other to beware Robert Lorenz’s “Trouble with the Curve,” I found myself liking it just fine. It’s a bit unruly in spots and amateurly conceived in others, but never to detriment. And even Clint Eastwood’s grizzled performance, threatening to make good on the promise of “Gran Torino” (i.e. that he’ll be in the self-parody business from here on out) didn’t strike the sour chord I expected it to.

Then as the movie went along, I realized the framing — my framing — was all wrong. This isn’t Clint Eastwood’s movie. This is Amy Adams’s movie. And she’s great. Coupled with “The Master,” her work here further shows a dynamic range for the actress, who by the way landed three Oscar nominations in just six years, for those keeping score at home. And if you’re still not convinced, have a look at “On the Road,” where she shows up out of nowhere and gives a unique if brief take opposite Viggo Mortensen.

In Lorenz’s film, Adams stars as Mickey (you can probably guess the reference), a young professional doing a pretty good job of keeping distance between herself and the potential suitors in her life. There’s a reason, of course, and that’s the sense of abandonment she took away from her early life with a single father, Gus (Eastwood), who spent most of his time on the road scouting for Major League Baseball. The script (from writer Randy Brown) sets her up on a scouting trip that doubles as a therapy session and, along the way, lessons are learned, breakthroughs are made and a valid enough theme is woven throughout.

Trouble With The Curve
18 September 2012   No Comments

Collider has published an interview with Trouble With The Curve cast done last Saturday during the press meeting. Check some excerpts:

Trouble with the Curve is one of those classic Hollywood movies that will make you laugh, cry and warm your heart. The drama tells the story of Gus Lobel (Clint Eastwood), one of the best scouts in baseball for decades, but whose age is finally catching up with him. With an associate director of scouting (Matthew Lillard) chomping at the bit to replace him, in favor of computer predictions of players, his daughter Mickey (Amy Adams) joins him on his latest scouting trip, in order to help him save his career, but quickly realizes that they may never be able to mend their strained relationship.

Amy, you have two incredibly contrasting roles opening right now, with Trouble with the Curve and The Master. What was it like to do those roles?

Articles & Interviews The Master Videos
17 September 2012   No Comments

Here’s another great interview by DP/30, shot in Toronto during “The Master” Press Conference:

Gallery Trouble With The Curve
17 September 2012   No Comments

So last Saturday it went place on Four Seasons Hotel, California, the “Trouble with the Curve” press conference. I have added 8 mq pictures of Amy in our gallery, so check it:

Articles & Interviews The Master
15 September 2012   No Comments

Last Saturday, just after the Venice Film Festival crowned “The Master” with two major awards, I shuffled toward the Park Hyatt Toronto suite where Amy Adams leaned against the door frame, singing and laughing with her reps who were seated in the hallway. She looked nothing like the prim, pregnant Peggy Dodd, whom she plays onscreen. In the movie, Peggy and her cult-leader husband, Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman), attempt to redeem Joaquin Phoenix’s postwar lost soul, Freddie Quell — without losing their own souls in the process. In person, the petite star is cheery and barefoot — her super-high heels wait like lap dogs at the foot of her chair, where she joins me after finishing another chorus of “Callate la boca.”

Amy Adams: I was singing “Callate la boca” — I was teaching my daughter to sing it. We say it to the dog: “Callate la boca.”